Connect with us

E-Business

IBM Reveals 5 Innovations to Change Human Lives in Next 5 Years

Published

on

IBM-logo.jpg

IBM unveiled has its annual “IBM 5 in 5” (#ibm5in5), a list of ground-breaking scientific innovations with the potential to change the way people work, live, and interact during the next five years.

These are:
With AI, our words will open a window into our mental health

Hyperimaging and AI will give us superhero vision

Macroscopes will help us understand Earth’s complexity in infinite detail

Medical labs “on a chip” will serve as health detectives for tracing disease at the nanoscale

Smart sensors will detect environmental pollution at the speed of light

In 1609, Galileo invented the telescope and saw our cosmos in an entirely new way. He proved the theory that Earth and other planets in our solar system revolve around the Sun, which until then was impossible to observe.

IBM Research continues this work through the pursuit of new scientific instruments – whether physical devices or advanced software tools – designed to make what’s invisible in our world visible, from the macroscopic level down to the nanoscale.

“The scientific community has a wonderful tradition of creating instruments to help us see the world in entirely new ways. For example, the microscope helped us see objects too small for the naked eye and the thermometer helped us understand temperature of the Earth and human body.” said Dario Gil, vice president of science & solutions at IBM Research.“With advances in artificial intelligence and nanotechnology, we aim to invent a new generation of scientific instruments that will make the complex invisible systems in our world today visible over the next five years.”

Innovation in this area could enable us to dramatically improve farming, enhance energy efficiency, spot harmful pollution before it’s too late, and prevent premature physical and mental health decline as examples. IBM’s global team of scientists and researchers is steadily bringing these inventions from the realm of our labs to the real world.

The IBM 5 in 5 is based on market and societal trends as well as emerging technologies from IBM’s Research labs around the world that can make these transformations possible. Here arethe five scientific instruments that will make the invisible visible in the next 5 years:

With AI, Our Words Will Open A Window Into Our Mental Health

Brain disorders, including developmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, represent an enormous disease burden, in terms of human suffering and economic cost. For example, today, one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental health condition such as depression, bipolar disease or schizophrenia, and roughly half of individuals with severe psychiatric disorders receive no treatment. The global cost of mental health conditions is projected to surge to US$ 6.0 trillion by 2030.

If the brain is a black box that we don’t fully understand, then speech is a key to unlock it. In five years, what we say and write will be used as indicators of our mental health and physical wellbeing. Patterns in our speech and writing analyzed by new cognitive systems will provide tell-tale signs of early-stage developmental disorders, mental illness and degenerative neurological diseases that can help doctors and patients better predict, monitor and track these conditions.

At IBM, scientists are using transcripts and audio inputs from psychiatric interviews, coupled with machine learning techniques, to find patterns in speech to help clinicians accurately predict and monitor psychosis, schizophrenia, mania and depression. Today, it only takes about 300 words to help clinicians predict the probability of psychosis in a user.2

In the future, similar techniques could be used to help patients with Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease, PTSD and even neuro-developmental conditions such as autism and ADHD. Cognitive computers can analyze a patient’s speech or written words to look for tell-tale indicators found in language, including meaning, syntax and intonation.

Combining the results of these measurements with those from wearable devices and imaging systems and collected in a secure network can paint a more complete picture of the individual for health professionals to better identify, understand and treat the underlying disease.

What were once invisible signs will become clear signals of patients’ likelihood of entering a certain mental state or how well their treatment plan is working, complementing regular clinical visits with daily assessments from the comfort of their homes.

Hyperimaging And AI Will Give Us Superhero Vision

More than 99.9 percent of the electromagnetic spectrum cannot be observed by the naked eye. Over the last 100 years, scientists have built instruments that can emit and sense energy at different wavelengths.

Today, we rely on some of these to take medical images of our body, see the cavity inside our tooth, check our bags at the airport, or land a plane in fog. However, these instruments are incredibly specialized and expensive and only see across specific portions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

In five years, new imaging devices using hyperimaging technology and AI will help us see broadly beyond the domain of visible light by combining multiple bands of the electromagnetic spectrum to reveal valuable insights or potential dangers that would otherwise be unknown or hidden from view.

Most importantly, these devices will be portable, affordable and accessible, so superhero vision can be part of our everyday experiences.

A view of the invisible or vaguely visible physical phenomena all around us could help make road and traffic conditions clearer for drivers and self-driving cars. For example, using millimeter wave imaging, a camera and other sensors, hyperimaging technology could help a car see through fog or rain, detect hazardous and hard-to-see road conditions such as black ice, or tell us if there is some object up ahead and its distance and size.

Cognitive computing technologies will reason about this data and recognize what might be a tipped over garbage can versus a deer crossing the road, or a pot hole that could result in a flat tire.

Embedded in our phones, these same technologies could take images of our food to show its nutritional value or whether it’s safe to eat. A hyperimage of a pharmaceutical drug or a bank check could tell us what’s fraudulent and what’s not. What was once beyond human perception will come into view.

IBM scientists are today building a compact hyperimaging platform that “sees” across separate portions of the electromagnetic spectrum in one platform to potentially enable a host of practical and affordable devices and applications.

Macroscopes Will Help Us Understand Earth’s Complexity In Infinite Detail

“Today, the physical world only gives us a glimpse into our interconnected and complex ecosystem. We collect exabytes of data – but most of it is unorganized. In fact, an estimated 80 percent of a data scientist’s time is spent scrubbing data instead of analyzing and understanding what that data is trying to tell us,” the report says.

Thanks to the Internet of Things, new sources of data are pouring in from millions of connected objects — from refrigerators, light bulbs and your heart rate monitor to remote sensors such as drones, cameras, weather stations, satellites and telescope arrays.

There are already more than six billion connected devices generating tens of exabytes of data per month, with a growth rate of more than 30 percent per year. After successfully digitizing information, business transactions and social interactions, we are now in the process of digitizing the physical world.

In five years, we will use machine-learning algorithms and software to help us organize the information about the physical world to help bring the vast and complex data gathered by billions of devices within the range of our vision and understanding. We call this a “macroscope” – but unlike the microscope to see the very small, or the telescope that can see far away, it is a system of software and algorithms to bring all of Earth’s complex data together to analyze it for meaning.

By aggregating, organizing and analyzing data on climate, soil conditions, water levels and their relationship to irrigation practices, for example, a new generation of farmers will have insights that help them determine the right crop choices, where to plant them and how to produce optimal yields while conserving precious water supplies.

In 2012, IBM Research began investigating this concept at Gallo Winery, integrating irrigation, soil and weather data with satellite images and other sensor data to predict the specific irrigation needed to produce an optimal grape yield and quality. In the future, macroscope technologies will help us scale this concept to anywhere in the world.

Beyond our own planet, macroscope technologies could handle, for example, the complicated indexing and correlation of various layers and volumes of data collected by telescopes to predict asteroid collisions with one another and learn more about their composition.

Medical Labs “On A Chip” Will Serve As Health Detectives For Tracing Disease At The Nanoscale

Early detection of disease is crucial. In most cases, the earlier the disease is diagnosed, the more likely it is to be cured or well controlled. However, diseases like cancer can be hard to detect – hiding in our bodies before symptoms appear. Information about the state of our health can be extracted from tiny bioparticles in bodily fluids such as saliva, tears, blood, urine and sweat.

Existing scientific techniques face challenges for capturing and analyzing these bioparticles, which are thousands of times smaller than the diameter of a strand of human hair.

In the next five years, new medical labs “on a chip”will serve as nanotechnology health detectives – tracing invisible clues in our bodily fluids and letting us know immediately if we have reason to see a doctor.

The goal is to shrink down to a single silicon chip all of the processes necessary to analyze a disease that would normally be carried out in a full-scale biochemistry lab.

The lab-on-a-chip technology could ultimately be packaged in a convenient handheld device to allow people to quickly and regularly measure the presence of biomarkers found in small amounts of bodily fluids, sending this information securely streaming into the cloud from the convenience of their home.

There it could be combined with real-time health data from other IoT-enabled devices, like sleep monitors and smart watches, and analyzed by AI systems for insights. When taken together, this data set will give us an in depth view of our health and alert us to the first signs of trouble, helping to stop disease before it progresses.

At IBM Research, scientists are developing lab-on-a-chip nanotechnology that can separate and isolate bioparticles down to 20 nanometers in diameter, a scale that gives access to DNA, viruses, and exosomes. These particles could be analyzed to potentially reveal presence of disease even before we have symptoms.

Smart Sensors Will Detect Environmental Pollution At The Speed Of Light

Most pollutants are invisible to the human eye, until their effects make them impossible to ignore. Methane, for example, is the primary component of natural gas, commonly considered a clean energy source.

But if methane leaks into the air before being used, it can warm the Earth’s atmosphere. Methane is estimated to be the second largest contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide (CO2).

In the United States, emissions from oil and gas systems are the largest industrial source of methane gas in the atmosphere.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that more than nine million metric tons of methane leaked from natural gas systems in 2014. Measured as CO2-equivalent over 100 years, that’s more greenhouse gases than were emitted by all U.S. iron and steel, cement and aluminum manufacturing facilities combined.

In five years, new, affordable sensing technologies deployed near natural gas extraction wells, around storage facilities, and along distribution pipelines will enable the industry to pinpoint invisible leaks in real-time.

Networks of IoT sensors wirelessly connected to the cloud will provide continuous monitoring of the vast natural gas infrastructure, allowing leaks to be found in a matter of minutes instead of weeks, reducing pollution and waste and the likelihood of catastrophic events.

Scientists at IBM are tackling this vision, working with natural gas producers such as Southwestern Energy to explore the development of an intelligent methane monitoring system and as part of the ARPA-E Methane Observation Networks with Innovative Technology to Obtain Reductions (MONITOR) program.

At the heart of IBM’s research is silicon photonics, an evolving technology that transfers data by light, allowing computing literally at the speed of light.

These chips could be embedded in a network of sensors on the ground or within infrastructure, or even fly on autonomous drones; generating insights that, when combined with real-time wind data, satellite data, and other historical sources, can be used to build complex environmental models to detect the origin and quantity of pollutants as they occur.

 

 

Nigeria CommunicationsWeek believes that technology makes life more exciting and helps improve the lives of people around Nigeria and indeed the world. So since 2007, we have devoted our energy to independent reportage of technology and how they affect lives.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

E-Business

IPV6 Council Nigeria @ Internet Solutions Harps on Early Migration

Published

on

L-r Chairman, Communication & Advocacy Committee (CAC) IPv6 Council Nigeria, Remmy Nweke, Council Member, Chief Chris Uwaje, Finance Manager, Internet Solutions (IS), Safiriyu Abiodun Rosenje, Chairman, IPv6 Council Nigeria, Mr. Muhammed Rudman, Project Manager IS, Ms Ifeoma Egbe, Head, Network Operations, Mr. George Olunwa, and member CAC, Mr. Chike Onwuegbusi, during a courtesy visit by IPv6 Council Nigeria to Internet Solutions, recently in Lagos

Internet Protocol Version Six (IPv6) Council in Nigeria has harped on the need for early migration and adoption, as part of its mandate and effort in creating awareness among service providers in the nation Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector.

 

Speaking during a courtesy visit to Internet Solution Nigeria, a leading Internet Service Provider in the country, Mr. Muhammed Rudman, council chairman, noted that the visit was designed to interact with Internet Solutions Nigeria, which the Council believes could be paving the way towards the realization of IPV6 migration, which is seen globally to provide enhanced Internet service experience.

 

Rudman decried the low level of IPv6 ready networks, as well as usage in Nigeria, despite the fact that the country occupied first and eight positions in internet usage in Africa and the world respectively.

 

“We are worried that some countries in Africa have started migrating to IPv6 networks, yet Nigeria that prides itself as number one in terms of Internet usage in Africa is not making a serious move,” he said.

 

He commended Internet Solutions for deploying IPv6 on its network and urged other service providers in the country to consider migrating to IPv6 for Nigeria to maintain its position in Africa and move higher in the global ranking.

 

He also said that migrating to IPV6 would create more robust and realtime end-to-end Internet connectivity and avert the possible blockade from the exhaustion of Internet Protocol Version Four (IPv4) addresses.

 

Responding, Mr. George Olunwa, head, Network Operations at Internet Solutions, said that Internet Solutions, has since deployed and advertised IPv6 block on the Internet, but the challenge is largely apathy from the enterprise customers, who are yet to see a pressing need for the implementation of IPV6 on their networks.

 

While thanking the IPV6 Council Nigeria for the advocacy visit and efforts so far, Olunwa assured that Internet Solutions would continue to push the idea of implementing IPv6 to its customers, admitting that the cost of migrating from IPv4 to IPv6 is next to nothing.

 

“What we have seen is that most of the clients are still going for IPV4, even though the cost of getting IPv6 is minimal. But, we believe that with this sort of advocacy being carried out by the IPv6  Council Nigeria, service providers as well as enterprise networks will begin to see a need for the deployment.

 

He also suggested a possibility of providing virtual lab for IPv6 within country, saying that will assist towards capacity building which can help to upscale the deployment and adoption of IPV6.

 

IPv6 is the most recent version of IP, the communications protocol that provides an identification and location system for computers on networks and routes traffic across the internet.

 

An Internet Protocol (IP) address is essentially a postal address for each and every Internet-connected device. Without one, websites will not know where to send the information each time a person performs a search or try to access a website.

 

Continue Reading

E-Business

NESG Challenge: Accenture Gives Free Technology, Advisory Services To L & L Foods, Accounteer & MyPadi.ng

Published

on

By peter oluka

Three companies that emerged tops at the recently held Nigerian Economic Summit Group start-up pitch in Abuja will receive free technology and business grooming services from Accenture.

Mr. Niyi Yusuf, the country managing director for Accenture Nigeria, who confirmed this in an interview with our correspondent in Abuja, said the grooming service was the company’s contribution to the emergence of future business giants.

Yusuf said, “Conventionally, Accenture works with large companies; but this is our own way of contributing to the nation’s development. We have been part of the Nigerian Economic Summit Group since inception 24 years ago.

“Now that NESG is looking at promotion of indigenous entrepreneurs who can be globally relevant and globally competitive, Accenture’s role in that process is to provide free advisory services on how to redefine their business model.”

He also said, “That is our own way of contributing to the development of the nation and building the next generation of entrepreneurs who will hopefully have big companies in the future that can then become clients of Accenture.

“Accenture will work with them for three to six months to redefine their business models and make them more attractive to investors. Access to capital is an issue. As we work with them, they should stand a better chance of getting investors. Money is the lifeline of the business.”

The start-up pitch event hosted by NESG saw three companies emerging tops from an initial list of more than 260 start-ups. The three companies are L & L Foods, Accounteer and MyPadi.ng.

L & L Foods, which won $15,000 for coming first, distributes peanuts; Accounteer, which won $10,000, helps business owners to manage their administration and help the businesses to professionalise, grow, and automate their administrative processes; while MyPadi.ng, which won $5,000, is a hostel booking platform.

Yusuf said for a start-up to succeed, it needs to be driven by people who had passion and competence while the business must be addressing problems relevant to the environment.

According to him, for a business to attract investors, the business needs to be driven by a team rather than an individual.

The Accenture boss said investors were more interested in investing in businesses founded and run by teams because teams would make for cross fertilisation of ideas as well as longevity of business.

Continue Reading

E-Business

Reasons Kaspersky Lab Is Opening Three Transparency Centers Worldwide

Published

on

By peter oluka

Kaspersky Lab has announced the launch of its Global Transparency Initiative (GTI) as part of its ongoing commitment to protecting customers from cyberthreats, regardless of their origin or purpose.

With this Initiative, Kaspersky Lab will engage the broader information security community and other stakeholders in validating and verifying the trustworthiness of its products, internal processes, and business operations, as well as introducing additional accountability mechanisms by which the company can further demonstrate that it addresses any security issues promptly and thoroughly.

As part of the Initiative, the company intends to provide the source code of its software – including software updates and threat-detection rules updates – for independent review and assessment.

As society today depends ever more on information and communications technologies (ICT), cyberthreats continue to proliferate and evolve. Because of the frenetic pace of both ICT deployment and the expansion of the threat landscape, Kaspersky Lab believes that increased cooperation to protect cyberspace is more crucial than ever.

Trust is essential in cybersecurity, and therefore trust should be the foundation of any collaboration among those seeking to secure individuals, organisations and enterprises from cyberthreats.

However, Kaspersky Lab also recognises that trust is not a given; it must be repeatedly earned through an ongoing commitment to transparency and accountability.

Kaspersky Lab’s Global Transparency Initiative is a reaffirmation of the company’s commitment to earning and maintaining the trust of the company’s customers and partners every day. The company has never taken this trust for granted, but it wants to strive for continuous improvement in every way it can.

The initial phase of Kaspersky Lab’s Global Transparency Initiative will include:

The start of an independent review of the company’s source code by Q1 2018, with similar reviews of the company’s software updates and threat detection rules to follow;

The commencement of an independent assessment of (i) the company’s secure development lifecycle processes, and (ii) its software and supply chain risk mitigation strategies by Q1 2018;

The development of additional controls to govern the company’s data processing practices in coordination with an independent party that can attest to the company’s compliance with said controls by Q1 2018;

The formation of three Transparency Centers globally, with plans to establish the first one in 2018, to address any security issues together with customers, trusted partners and government stakeholders; the centers will serve as a facility for trusted partners to access reviews on the company’s code, software updates, and threat detection rules, along with other activities. The Transparency Centers will open in Asia, Europe and the U.S. by 2020.

The increase of bug bounty awards up to $100,000 for the most severe vulnerabilities found under the company’s Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure program to further incentivise independent security researchers to supplement our vulnerability detection and mitigation efforts, by the end of 2017.

In addition to launching this initial phase of its Global Transparency Initiative, Kaspersky Lab looks forward to engaging with its stakeholders and the information security community to determine what the next phase of the initiative – commencing in H2 2018 – should include.

Speaking of the need for this new initiative, Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and CEO of Kaspersky Lab, said: “Internet balkanisation benefits no one except cybercriminals. Reduced cooperation among countries helps the bad guys in their operations, and public-private partnerships don’t work like they should. The internet was created to unite people and share knowledge. Cybersecurity has no borders, but attempts to introduce national boundaries in cyberspace is counterproductive and must be stopped.

“We need to reestablish trust in relationships between companies, governments and citizens. That’s why we’re launching this Global Transparency Initiative: we want to show how we’re completely open and transparent. We’ve nothing to hide. And I believe that with these actions we’ll be able to overcome mistrust and support our commitment to protecting people in any country on our planet.”

Kaspersky Lab will share details of the Initiative’s progress and additional activities regularly.

By collaborating with its various stakeholders, Kaspersky Lab hopes that its customers and partners will join it on this journey.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Communication Week Media Limited.