Connect with us

News

Lift ban on radio station, Falz’s ‘This is Nigeria’; SERAP urges NBC

Published

on

Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) has called on the National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) “to immediately lift the ban on Jay FM 101.9 Jos, stopping the radio station from playing songs such as Falz’s ‘This is Nigeria’, Wande Coal’s ‘Iskaba’ and Olamide’s ‘See Mary, See Jesus’, and rescind the unlawful fine of N100,000 imposed on the station.”

 

The organization said the action by the NBC “amounts to illegal restrictions on media freedom, the right to freedom of opinion and expression and free information and ideas.”

 

The NBC had in a letter dated August 6th, 2018 and addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, JODAJ Global Communications Limited, Jos, owners of Jay FM 101.9 stated varying reasons for the ban and fine ranging from ‘vulgar and indecent lyrics’ in contravention of the body’s regulations.

 

But in a statement on Sunday signed by SERAP’s Deputy Director, Timothy Adewale, the organization expressed “Concern about the censorship of the media and songs deemed ‘vulgar and indecent’ by the NBC, as such action risks undermining legitimate expression and independent voices.

 

“The NBC must immediately lift the ban on the radio station and rescind the arbitrary fine.”

 

The organization said, “The right to freedom of expression, information and ideas is applicable not only to comfortable, inoffensive or politically correct opinions, but also to ideas that offend, shock and disturb.

 

The constant confrontation of ideas, even controversial ones, is a stepping stone to achieving a vibrant democratic society, transparency, accountability and respect for the rule of law.”

 

The statement read in part: “Vague rules on vulgarity and indecency should not be used subjectively to ban or fine independent media outlets, particularly radio and television channels.

 

“The action by the NBC can create an uncertain environment for radio and television stations and media professionals in general and lead to fostering self-censorship and shunning any meaningful criticism of public policies and authorities.

“The NBC is adopting vague rules vulgarity and indecency to undermine freedom of expression, right to information and opinion.

 

“By banning the radio station from playing the songs, the NBC is not only undermining and harming the station, but also undermining everyone’s right to information, public participation and open and democratic governance”

 

“Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which Nigeria is a state party includes the right of individuals to criticize or openly and publicly evaluate their Governments without fear of interference or punishment.

 

“It is important for the NBC to strive to promote diversity of views, and the media’s importance as a platform for public debate about important matters of public interest and ideas.

 

“Censorship or impermissible restrictions in the exercise of media freedom and freedom of expression can restrict free circulation of ideas and opinions and impose obstacles to the free flow of information.

 

“Freedom of the press and other news media afford the public one of the best means of discovering and forming an opinion of the ideas on political and social issues and other issues of public interest.

 

“Not only does the NBC have the task of ensuring that radio stations and other media organizations can function effectively to impart such information and ideas: the public also has a right to receive them.

 

“SERAP notes that three clear-cut conditions must be respected for any limitation on the right to freedom of expression and free information: (a) restrictions must be established in law; (b) they should pursue an aim recognized as lawful, and (c) they must be proportional to the accomplishment of that aim.

 

“SERAP considers the action by the NBC against the radio station to be inconsistent with the principle of proportionality and therefore impairing the free exercise of the right both to impart and to receive information and ideas.”

 

It would be recalled that the NBC had cited the radio station’s airing of a song by Falz titled “This is Nigeria” saying the song was laced with vulgar lyrics, ‘this is Nigeria, look how we living now, everybody be criminal.’

 

Also, the NBC cited the airing of a song by Wande Coal titled, ”Iskaba” as laced with vulgar lyrics, ”Girl you de make me kolo, shaking the ass like kolo” in contravention of Section 3.6.1 and 3.13.2.2c.’

 

The NBC also cited Jay FM airing a song by Olamide titled “See Mary, See Jesus” which it claimed was laced with casual use of the names of “Mary” and “Jesus” regarded as sacred by the Christian faith which contravenes Section, 4.3.1e.

Ugo Onwuaso is an ICT enthusiast. He believes technology should be used for general good. He holds a Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree from the Lagos state University.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

News

There is Massive, Pervasive Corruption in Buhari’s Govt- US Report

Published

on

The United States Department of State has said there is a climate of impunity in the President Muhammadu Buhari government that allows officials to engage in corrupt practices with a sense of exemption from punishment.

 

The State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labour, in its Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2018, said Nigeria had made little progress in efforts to limit corruption in its public service.

 

The US Congress mandates the executive to produce a report on the state of human rights worldwide every year.

 

For Nigeria, the findings in the 2018 Human Rights Report, released Thursday, were largely similar to those of the previous year’s report, indicating lack of real progress in the government’s anti-corruption war.

 

The report said, “Although the law provides criminal penalties for conviction of official corruption, the government did not implement the law effectively, and officials frequently engaged in corrupt practices with impunity.

 

“Massive, widespread, and pervasive corruption affected all levels of government and the security services. There were numerous reports of government corruption during the year.”

 

The report stated that the country’s two key anti-corruption agencies, the Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission (ICPC) and the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), had broad powers to prosecute corruption, but rarely applied such powers to conscientiously and logically prosecute corruption cases.

 

It stated, “The EFCC writ extends only to financial and economic crimes. The ICPC secured 14 convictions during the year. In 2016 the EFCC had 66 corruption cases pending in court, had secured 13 convictions during the year, and had 598 open investigations.

 

“Although ICPC and EFCC anti-corruption efforts remained largely focused on low and mid-level government officials, following the 2015 presidential election, both organisations started investigations into and brought indictments against various active and former high-level government officials. Many of these cases were pending in court. According to both ICPC and EFCC, the delays were the result of a lack of judges and the widespread practice of filing for and granting multiple adjournments.

 

“EFCC arrests and indictments of politicians continued throughout the year, implicating a significant number of opposition political figures and leading to allegations of partisan motivations on the part of the EFCC. In October the EFCC arrested and indicted former governor of Ekiti State Ayo Fayose on 11 counts, including conspiracy and money laundering amounting to 2.2 billion naira ($6 million). After a Federal High Court ruling, Fayose was out on 50 million naira ($137,500) bail.”

 

On financial disclosure, the report noted the constitutional requirement under the Code of Conduct Bureau and Tribunal Act (CCBTA) for public officials, including the president, vice president, governors, deputy governors, cabinet ministers, and legislators (at both federal and state levels), to declare their assets to the Code of Conduct Bureau (CCB) before assuming and after leaving office. The constitution calls for the CCB to “make declarations available for inspection by any citizen of the country on such terms and conditions as the National Assembly may prescribe,” said the report. “The law does not address the publication of asset information. Violators risk prosecution, but cases rarely reached conclusion.”

 

Perhaps, more chilling was the finding that arbitrary deprivation of life and unlawful killings were prevalent in Nigeria in 2018. The report cited several examples.

 

It said, “There were several reports the government or its agents committed arbitrary and unlawful killings. The national police, army, and other security services used lethal and excessive force to disperse protesters and apprehend criminals and suspects and committed other extrajudicial killings.

 

“Authorities generally did not hold police, military, or other security force personnel accountable for the use of excessive or deadly force or for the deaths of persons in custody.

 

“State and federal panels of inquiry investigating suspicious deaths generally did not make their findings public.

 

“In August 2017 the acting president convened a civilian-led presidential investigative panel to review compliance of the armed forces with human rights obligations and rules of engagement, and the panel submitted its findings in February. As of November no portions of the report had been made public.

 

“As of September there were no reports of the federal government further investigating or holding individuals accountable for the 2015 killing and subsequent mass burial of members of the Shia group, Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN), and other civilians by Nigerian Army (NA) forces in Zaria, Kaduna State. “

 

The report noted the 2016 nonbinding report of the Kaduna State government’s judicial commission, which found that the Nigerian Army (NA) used “excessive and disproportionate” force during the 2015 altercations in which 348 members of the Islamic Movement in Nigeria (IMN) and one soldier died.

 

It said, “The commission recommended the federal government conduct an independent investigation and prosecute anyone found to have acted unlawfully. It also called for the proscription of the IMN and the monitoring of its members and their activities.

 

“In 2016 the government of Kaduna State published a white paper that included acceptance of the commission’s recommendation to investigate and prosecute allegations of excessive and disproportionate use of force by the NA.

 

“As of September, however, there was no indication that authorities had held any members of the NA accountable for the events in Zaria. It also accepted the recommendation to hold IMN leader Sheikh Ibrahim Zakzaky responsible for all illegal acts committed by IMN members during the altercations and in the preceding 30 years. In 2016 a federal court declared the continued detention without charge of Zakzaky and his wife illegal and unconstitutional.

 

“The court ordered their release by January 2017. The federal government did not comply with this order, and Zakzaky, his spouse, and other IMN members remained in detention. In April the Kaduna State government charged Zakzaky in state court with multiple felonies stemming from the death of the soldier at Zaria. The charges include culpable homicide, which can carry the death penalty. As of December the case was pending. In July a Kaduna High Court dismissed charges of aiding and abetting culpable homicide against more than 80 IMN members. As of September the Kaduna State government had appealed the ruling. Approximately 100 additional IMN members remained in detention.

 

“In October security forces killed 45 IMN members that were participating in processions and protests, according to Amnesty International (AI).”

 

The report recalled the January 2017 bombing of an informal internally displaced persons (IDPs) settlement in Rann, Borno State, by the Nigerian Air Force, which resulted in the killing and injuring of more than 100 civilians and aid workers.

 

It said, “The government and military leaders publicly assumed responsibility for the strike and launched an investigation. The air force conducted its own internal investigation, but as of December the government had not made public its findings. No air force or army personnel were known to have been held accountable for their roles in the event. There were reports of arbitrary and unlawful killings related to internal conflicts in the North-east and other areas.”

 

The report identified the following human rights issues in Nigeria: unlawful and arbitrary killings by both government and non-state actors; forced disappearances by both government and non-state actors; torture by both government and non-state actors; and prolonged arbitrary detention in life-threatening conditions, particularly, in government detention facilities. Others are harsh and life threatening prison conditions, including civilian detentions in military facilities, often based on flimsy or no evidence; infringement on citizens’ privacy rights; criminal libel; substantial interference with the rights of peaceful assembly and freedom of association, in particular for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons; and refoulement of refugees.

 

The report also identified as human rights abuse corruption; progress to formally separate child soldiers previously associated with the Civilian Joint Task Force (CJTF); lack of accountability concerning violence against women, including female genital mutilation/cutting, in part due to government inaction/negligence; trafficking in persons, including sexual exploitation and abuse by security officials; crimes involving violence targeting LGBTI persons and the criminalisation of status and same-sex sexual conduct based on sexual orientation and gender identity; and forced and bonded labour.

 

The report, however, noted that the government took steps to investigate alleged abuses but took fewer steps to prosecute officials who committed violations, whether in the security forces or elsewhere in the government.

 

“Impunity remained widespread at all levels of government. The government did not adequately investigate or prosecute most of the major outstanding allegations of human rights violations by the security forces or the majority of cases of police or military extortion or other abuse of power,” the report added.

Continue Reading

News

Umunna, News Express Publisher Loses Mother

Published

on

late Madam Margaret Umunna Edeyi

The death has been announced of Madam Margaret Umunna Edeyi, a devout Christian and community leader from Umuokogbuo Eluama in Isuikwuato, Abia State.

 

Maggie, as she was fondly called, died on Wednesday morning, March 13, 2019, in Warri, Delta State, aged around 90 years.

 

She is survived by five children, among them Mr. Isaac Umunna, an award-winning international journalist and Publisher of News Express titles.

 

Maggie is also survived by several grandchildren and great grandchildren, as well as a host of relatives.

 

Paying tribute to the departed matriarch, Isaac Umunna said: “Mama was a virtuous woman known for her devotion to God, her family and humanity.

 

“Though she became widowed at a rather young age, she remained chaste for the rest of her life. She didn’t go to school but did everything within her power to ensure that her children did.

 

“Mama was a quintessential wife and mother. She will be greatly missed but we are comforted by her rich legacy of honesty, hard work, love for God and love for humanity.”

 

Umunna added that burial arrangements would be disclosed in due course

Continue Reading

News

Akinwuntan says Ecobank Omni-Lite is Designed to Empower Businesses

Published

on

Patrick Akinwuntan, managing director of Ecobank Nigeria, has reaffirmed that the bank’s recently upgraded online banking platform for businesses, Omni Lite, is versatile, secure and user friendly. He urged business owners to take advantage of the services available on the platform which has been specifically optimised for them.

Those in the commercial sector such as Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), faith based organisations, educational institutions, non-government organisation and government institutions, can manage their transactions effectively and access an array of tailor made solutions designed to empower their businesses.

According to Akinwuntan, Omni Lite is primarily designed with business owners in mind. It comes with features to enhance businesses such as efficient and seamless cash flow management, easy view of all accounts and expenses in one place, convenient salary payment with bulk payments upload, management of loan payments, exchange rates calculation and other interesting features.

Further, Akinwuntan noted that with Omni Lite, customers have access to real time transaction details, domestic and interbank funds transfers and online loan requests. The platform comes with best in its class security tools to ensure that users are protected.

He enjoined business owners to register for Ecobank Omni Lite to discover how the platform can help grow and manage their businesses.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Communication Week Media Limited.