You are here

Dangote Shrugs Off Trouble with FG, Invests $4.6Bn

PrintPrintEmailEmail
bankole orija with agency report
Aliko Dangote
Aliko Dangote

Dangote Group, controlled by Africa’s richest man, Aliko Dangote, plans to invest $3.8 billion in sugar and rice and $800 million in dairy production in the next three years as the company seeks to expand and deal with a shortage of dollars needed to import raw materials.

The group appeared to have shrugged off threat by the federal government to prosecute Alheri Engineering Company Limited, a telecoms business unit of the group for contravening Nigerian communications law.

Alheri, a 3G licensee and six other companies were allegedly operating with expired licences and has been given a 14-day pre-enforcement notice by the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC)

But as the unit deals with that, the conglomerate plans to increase its production of sugar to 1.5 million metric tons a year by 2020 from 100,000 tons now and is seeking to add 1 million tons of rice,

Edwin Devakumar, executive director at Dangote’s industries unit, said Tuesday in an interview in Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial hub. The company also plans to have 50,000 cattle producing 500 million liters of milk a year by 2019, he said.

A lack of foreign exchange means companies need to invest in local agriculture to help meet demand for food from Nigeria’s population of more than 180 million, Devakumar said. “All raw sugar has to be imported today, same thing for flour milling,” he said.

Dangote, whose cement unit is Nigeria’s biggest listed company, has been investing in agriculture as the country’s government seeks to diversify away from oil, which accounts for 90 percent of the nation’s export earnings and the bulk of revenue.

The economy, which plunged into its first recession in a quarter-century last year amid falling crude prices, is forecast by the World Bank to expand by 1.2 percent this year.

Dangote plans to cultivate 350,000 hectares (864,850 acres) of land for sugar cane and add 200,000 hectares for rice, according to Devakumar. The company has ordered five plants for sugar milling and 10 for rice from Switzerland to be located in the north of the country, he said.

Section