You are here

NaijaBet Takes Bets on Sick 'Buhari to Return' Game

PrintPrintEmailEmail
bankole orija with agency report
President Muhammadu Buhari.
President Muhammadu Buhari.

President Muhammadu Buhari who has been away in London for almost three months on health grounds has become the subject of a sports betting game in Nigeria.

A popular sports gaming site, NaijaBet.com, is asking those interested to stake their money on when Buhari who left Nigeria on May 7 on his latest medical trip to the British capital, would return.

The company usually focusses on English Premiership, Champions League and other sporting events, but recently launched the 'Buhari to Return' game:

NaijaBet dismissed claims that it disrespected the country’s ailing president.

It said “We would just like to put this on record, Nigerians want their president back, we are only trying to voice the yearning of the people via the little platform we have,” Naija Bet tweeted on Thursday in reply to a tweet by The Guardian on the subject.

The betting company went on;
////YOU CAN BET ON IF HE WILL RETURN ON THE 2ND WEEK OF AUGUST OR THE 4TH///

The 74-year-old Buhari first sought treatment in London in June last year for what presidency officials said was a persistent inner ear infection, returning in six months for check-ups that were later said to be "a long period of treatment".

Buhari himself admitted on his return to Abuja in March that he had not been that ill before.

Despite Vice President Yemi Osinbajo's acting on his behalf, Buhari's protracted absence has sparked intense public debate in Nigeria.

Last month, both members of the ruling party and the opposition went to see him in London and even took pictures with him in London to douse public anxiety.

The health of Nigerian leaders has often been a contentious issue.

Buhari, a former military ruler in the 1980s, was dogged by speculation about his health even before the election win in 2015 that brought him to power.

During that campaign, the then-ruling party claimed he was seriously ill with prostate cancer and even put out advertisements insinuating he would die in office.

He rejected the claims as unfounded.

In 2010, Nigeria was plunged into months of political turmoil after president Umaru Musa Yar'Adua died in office following months of treatment in Saudi Arabia.

Section