Connect with us

E-Financial

SBH Raises Alarm over Non-Remittance N20trillion Deducted as Stamp Duty

Published

on

stamp-duty.jpg

Stamp Duty charges on bank transactions believed to have yielded N20trillion have developed wings and School of Banking Honours (SBH) has raised alarm, according to Nation.

Federal government through the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) on January 19 directed that N50 stamp duty be made on all transactions including bank electronic transactions above N1000.

The policy is aimed at boosting the country’s revenue base through non-oil sectors such as taxes and rates.

But the fortune raked in, has pitched the Nigerian Interbank Settlement System (NIBSS) against the School of Banking Honours, an institution registered by the Nigerian Copyright Commission (NCC).

The SBH is spearheading the recovery and remittance of the funds into the Federation Account for sharing by the Federal Government and the 36 states.

Tola Adekoya, SBH’s Project Consultant/Acting Rector, said based on findings from the research arm of SBH, he raised a Demand Notice dated 10th March, 2015, entitled, “Stamp Duty On Electronic Transfer Receipts (2013-2014)” on NIBSS for N7.719trillion as accruing and unremitted revenue to the Federal Government and the states.

He was invited by NIBSS for a discussion, but Adekoya is yet to honour the invitation.

“That invitation is traceable to the Demand Notice of 10th March 2015 that SBH raised on NIBSS as Stamp Duty of N7.7 Trillion due to 36 states and the Federal Government on electronic cash-less transfers which turned over an aggregate N160 Billion daily in just five states of the federation in early 2013, as reported by Central Bank Nigeria (CBN),” Adekoya said.

He told The Nation that from all indications, that figure may have risen close to N20trillion.

He said: ”Further reports revealed that the Stamp Duty revenue has now increased to N20trillion (in local banks), or $53.3 billion (in foreign banks) in four years to 31st March, 2017, and out of which less than one per cent was later swept into a dedicated account with Central Bank of Nigeria, in 2016.”

To him, the matter of diverted public fund should be of serious concern to the public in view of the amount that is in contention and the involvement of agencies and persons allegedly denying governments of such huge revenue collected from the unsuspecting banking public and for appropriate disciplinary action to be taken.

By its Memorandum of Association, the SBH is approved to research into banking operations, and collaborate with banks and government on banking matters. It is empowered to represent government in the suit under its Copyright Certificate No. LW1023 dated 27th September 2012, and titled, “50-Naira Stamp Duty for Government on Electronic Cashless Transfers and Manual Bank Teller Deposits”.

Adekoya said the alleged diversion of public funds should be of serious concern to the public in view of the amounts involved, and the culpability of agencies and persons that have been denying government of such huge revenue collected from unsuspecting banking public, for appropriate disciplinary action.

He said the SBH had approached the CBN in 2012 to partner on the research outcomes that would absorb retrenched and ex-bankers to lead its young emerging bankers on practical part-time banking jobs at a lower career level that is branded as “Shadow-Banking”.

“SBH clarified that Shadow-Banking products would birth other Shadow Industries to absorb the youth in high volume, until vacancies exist in their target career sectors, and for which they could be employed,” Adekoya said, adding that the SBH offer was turned down by the CBN, hence the body later aligned its job creation activities with CBN’s Financial System Strategy (FSS) 2020, but the CBN did not complement this, either, he stated.

Undeterred, Adekoya said, “the Institute then proceeded with a proposal to Nigerian Postal Services (NIPOST) on 20th April 2012 to increase its internal revenue by exploring a narrow window provided for affixing adhesive stamp on banking receipts in Stamp Duties Act 2004, and a Master Services Agreement was signed by both parties on 14th September 2012”.

“The institute then reverted to CBN on its first research work by a letter dated 27th September 2012, titled, “Revenue Collection for Government through Banks”, requesting for approval to engage banks and other financial institutions as collecting agents on the stamping and remittance of Stamp Duty on manual and electronic transfer receipts from N1,000 ( inclusive of all those from below N500,000 that CBN had earlier set as limit for banks) into government coffers,” the report said.

The SBH got approval letters from the CBN. Its two defined roles were firstly to affix N50 stamp as evidence of Stamp Duty Paid on bank receipts, as covered by the Master Services Agreement with NIPOST, and secondly to sweep Stamp Duty Revenue to government, as duly covered by the Copyright Certificate No. LW1023.

Based on the CBN approvals, the institute secured written commitments from three banks to lead other banks on manual stamp duty collection for government.

Adekoya said  since “NIBSS needed no such circular on electronic stamp duty collection for the government, because it runs a central operation, it joined the institute at a press conference on 4th January 2013 to support the government’s revenue project, and was engaged as the ‘official sweeping agent’ for government on 7th January 2013.”

He said the government directed that the only thing we should not charge stamp duty on is naira currency. “We went to Nigeria Interbank Settlement System (NIBSS), which is the firm maintaining the portal for cash-less policy for all the banks. By January 2013, we were ready to run it. Since 1993, NIBSS has not remitted any stamp duty to the government,” Adekoya, said.

Nigeria CommunicationsWeek believes that technology makes life more exciting and helps improve the lives of people around Nigeria and indeed the world. So since 2007, we have devoted our energy to independent reportage of technology and how they affect lives.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

E-Financial

CBN Mandates Banks to Settle Customers’ Complaints within Two Weeks

Published

on

The Central Bank of Nigeria has directed banks and other financial institutions to settle customers’ complaints on issues of overcharge, unauthorised deductions and other matters within two weeks.

The CBN Head of Complaints Management Division, Mr. Tajudeen Ahmed, said this in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria on Thursday in Abuja.

He said the CBN would ensure that bank customers get a redress on issues of excess charges or unauthorised withdrawals.

Ahmed reiterated the apex bank’s commitment to eradicating excess and arbitrary charges.

According to him, the CBN has since issued a circular which could be found on its website, showing all legitimate bank charges.

He said that any charge outside what is stated in the circular is not allowed.

“The consumer protection department issued guidelines to banks dated August 16, 2011, directing all banks and other financial institutions to resolve all customer complaints within two weeks of receipt.

“Before the expiration of that complaint, the financial institution is expected to be engaging the customer on a continuous basis to update him or her on the status of the complaint.

“If it is not resolved within the deadline given, then such a person is encouraged to draw the attention of Central Bank of Nigeria to the complaint,” he said.

Ahmed advised customers with unresolved complaints to contact the CBN by writing to the Director Consumer Protection Department or send an email to cbd@cbn.gov.ng.

He also advised dissatisfied bank customers to visit any branch of the CBN closest to them to make their complaints.

“The CBN continually engages the banks to find out if their conduct and practices are fair to their customers in order to stimulate people’s confidence in the banking system.

“Non-adherence to that normally results to regulatory sanctions, as the case may be,” he said.

Ahmed also faulted banks for setting a limit on ATM withdrawals.

“I have also observed and noted this. Don’t forget that at the beginning, it wasn’t like this. Over time, we started having this problem.

“One of the reasons is that the quantum of N500 denomination is much more than that of N1,000 denomination.

“When we approached the banks about these problems, they said the machines become easily faulty when it is set to dispense up to N30,000 to N40,000 units.

“However, CBN has directed that the machines that allow payment of up to N30,000 to N50,000 should be installed.

“This is still ongoing. The Banking and Payment Department of the CBN is championing it,” he said.

Also, the Head of Consumer Protection Division, Mrs. Hadija Kasim, said bank customers could also avoid some of these issues by inculcating the habit of cashless policy.

She reminded the public that there were various methods to make payments rather than carrying cash.

“Let’s not forget that ATM cards can also be used on Point of Sale (POS) terminals.

“We are encouraging people that unless it is absolutely necessary, they should reduce the carriage of cash.

“Cashless transactions are more convenient, safer and you will avoid the problem of overcharges,” she said.

Kasim also advised bank consumers to use bank transfer channels for transactions in cases where sellers do not have POS.

Continue Reading

E-Financial

Nigerian Bank Investors Lose N100Bn in 2 Days

Published

on

Investors with shares in the banking sector on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) have lost over N100.8 billion in two trading days of the week, a report this morning by Vanguard said.

 

It said that while 11 out of the 16 banks in the NSE began losing prices in the market on Monday, the remaining joined by Tuesday, except United Bank for Africa Plc (UBA).

 

The report listed banks that appreciated to include: Access Bank (5 kobo) per share to close at N12.56 per share from N12.60 per share, GTBank gained N1.00 per share to close at N47.50 per share, from N46.50 per share, Fidelity Bank gained (8kobo) per share to close at N3.28 per share from N3.20 per share and Jaiz Bank gained 4 kobo per share to close at N1.04 per share from N1.00 per share.

 

However, during Tuesday trading session, all the banks’ share prices dropped except UBA which gained 20 kobo per share to close at N12.20 from N12.00 per share it closed on Monday.

 

The report blamed the trend on the recent directive by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) that restricted dividend payments by banks with high Non Performing Loans (NPLs) and low Capital Adequacy Ratio, CAR from paying dividend to their shareholders.

Continue Reading

E-Financial

SEC, NSE, CSCS Rake N11.430Bn in 2017 from Share Sales

Published

on

A total of N11.43 billion accrued as earnings from the sales of shares to the three major players in the Nigerian equities in 2017, according to findings by business a.m.

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the market regulator, the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE), the market platform provider and the Central Securities Clearing System (CSCS), which provides clearing facilities to facilitate transactions, jointly earned this amount from the sales.

 

The 2017 figures represented an increase of N6.210 billion or119 percent over the amount earned in the corresponding period of 2016, which had stood at N5.220 billion.

 

SEC received 0.3 percent of total value of equity sold by shareholders (seller) as commission, NSE received 0.3 percent of total value of equity bought by shareholders (buyer) as commission less value added tax, while the CSCS, which facilitates the delivery (transfer of shares from seller to buyer) and settlement (payment for shares) of securities transacted on the floor of the NSE received 0.3 percent of total value of equity bought by shareholders (from buyer) as commission less value added tax.

 

Market activities had risen significantly in 2017 with turnover figures showing a 121 percent rise to N1.27 trillion during the year, from N0.58 trillion in 2016.

 

The rise last year reflected a recovery in activities at the bourse from the macroeconomic overhang of a commodity down cycle, pushing it to become the third best performing market in 2017 globally, with a 42 percent return in the NSE ASI index.

 

The three market umpires, namely SEC, NSE and CSCS, each made N3.810 billion from equity sellers in 2017, available data show.

The Nigerian government, which is responsible for collecting stamp duty, also benefited from the increased activities at the Stock Exchange as shareholders paid a total of N1.906 billion as stamp duty to the government.

 

Due to the difference in brokerage commission charge, business a.m. found that stockbroking firms earned between N19.02 billion to N34.29 billion from shareholders during the period. Apart from the commission received from equity transactions, there are other ways through which SEC, NSE and CSCS generate money.

 

Some of the key revenue sources for SEC are fees on government bonds and debentures of public limited companies; processing fees for schemes of merger/acquisition and takeover as well as fines and penalties.

 

The commission is also entitled to application fees for registration of a collective investment scheme at a flat rate of N35,000; filing fee for registration of securities at a flat rate of N10,000; registration fees of securities of public companies (including rights issue); special funds; and processing fees on offer for sale.

 

Also, the NSE generates money from listing fees, broker/dealer fees, fines, among others.

 

Speaking in January at the 2017 market recap and outlook for 2018, Oscar Onyema, chief executive of the NSE attributed the performance in part to Central Bank’s monetary policies that resulted in increased liquidity in the foreign exchange market.

 

He stated that “IPO activity in the year remained mute, however, there were several other positive indicators including the revival of supplementary listings and the return of new issuances. The value of supplementary listings increased by 27 percent, bringing the total value of equity issues in 2017 to N408 billion”.

 

Onyema also said the NSE fixed income market recorded mixed performance. “New bond issuances increased over the previous year, while bond yields gradually moderated from 2016 levels amidst easing inflation and greater FX stability. Yields across various tenors declined between 0.4 percent and 1.5 percent, and market turnover declined by 24 percent in 2017, as investors sought higher returns in alternative product classes.

 

“However, supplementary issuances by the Federal Government saw bond market capitalization increase by 34 percent year-on-year,” he said, adding that, “The NSE’s ETF market witnessed increased activity across key metrics in 2017, recording a 272 percent year-on-year growth in trade volumes, 33 percent growth in turnover and a 40 percent year-on-year increase in market capitalization to close the year at N6.69 billion.”

 

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Communication Week Media Limited.